CES 2018

2018-01-13 by vertigo

So 2018 marks the first year I was able to make it to CES. It's been a dream of mine to attend the largest (or one of the largest) electronics shows in the world for well over a decade, and I'm absolutely thrilled I was given the opportunity. One thing that was on my mind was how it compared to other events I'm a little more familiar with, like PAX West and CEDIA. Immediately apparent was the size - CES is absolutely impractically gigantic. Hundreds of thousands of people crammed into 2.75 million square feet of exhibition space, with almost 4,000 exhibitors and every type of tech (and every type of "what the heck?") you can imagine. It's overwhelming to be sure, not to mention confusing. It took the entire first day for me to become acquainted with the general locations of the 6+ show flow areas, and half of the next day to figure out there was way more that I had yet to discover.nnAs for the tech, I was extremely impressed by both the Sony and LG booths, where each showed off demos that represent what we should expect from display tech in years to come. Sony with their 85" 10,000 nit 8K HDR display (which was showing 4K HDR content because the 8K aspect is essentially just a footnote compared to the other tech it brings to the table), and LG with the flexible and roll-able OLEDs and video walls. Samsung also impressed with their 146" 4K mircoLED modular Wall TV, and the level of self driving car tech displayed by Toyota, Nissan, nVidia and others reminded me of something straight out of Black Mirror (in a good way). nnAlthough I wasn't able to see nearly all of it, it's an experience I would recommend to any fellow tech enthusiast who wants to feel like they're genuinely experiencing a taste of the future. If you want to see a few of the pictures I took on the show floor, check out my Instagram (@vertigo2720).
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